White Paper – Open vStorage + Swift, a killer VM storage combo

OpenStack Swift, probably the most used Object Storage for private cloud implementations, offers features which are very appealing for building a distributed storage solution. Alas, issues such as eventual consistency and the fact that hypervisors require block storage and can’t work with Object Storage, make it unsuitable for primary Virtual Machine storage. Open vStorage is the solution to turn Swift into a block device for Virtual Machines. The combination of Open vStorage + Swift offers great performance due to aggressive caching inside the Host, a unified namespace and many VM-centric features. Open vStorage…Read more …

Open vStorage 1.3

July arrived, a new Open vStorage release sees the light. We are happy to announce Open vStorage 1.3 which is a milestone release for Open vStorage: it is the first release where all content within a vPool is stored on the Storage Backend. On top, we now support the most used object store in the world, Swift. The File Driver: In earlier version we requested the user to set up a distributed file system (which is very complex) to store the non-volume data or use a BitTorrent sync protocol to keep these non-volume…Read more …

vMotion, Storage Router Teamwork

Important note: this blog posts talks about vMotion, a VMware feature. KVM fans should not be disappointed as Live Migration, the KVM version of vMotion is also supported by Open vStorage. We use the term vMotion as it is the most used term for this feature by the general IT public. In a previous blogpost we explained why Open vStorage is different. One thing we do differently is not implementing a distributed file system. This sparked the interest of a lot of people but also raised questions for more clarification. Especially more information…Read more …

What is the big deal with Virtual Volumes, VMware?

June 30 2014, mark the date, people. This is the day when VMware announced their public beta of Virtual Volumes. Virtual Volumes, or VVOL as VMware likes to call them, put a Virtual Machine and its disks, rather than a LUN, into the storage management spotlight. Through a specific API, vSphere APIs for Storage Awareness (VASA), your storage array becomes aware of Virtual Machines and their Virtual Disks. VASA allows to offload certain Virtual Machine operations such as snapshotting and cloning to the (physical) storage array. Now, what is the big deal with…Read more …